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Author Topic: New stopper  (Read 4245 times)

Not Another Puff

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #105 on: May 20, 2019, 02:36:08 pm »
@bignige that is fantastic news on the no patch front, congratulations.
35 years a smoker until Bastille Day 2018, now a smoker who is choosing not to smoke for the foreseeable future
 

bignige

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #106 on: May 20, 2019, 05:40:50 pm »
No patch on again today. Not used the spray at all.

Still very "nervy" and in fact feeling ill - sickly, dehydrated and tired.

I thought after 8/9 weeks I would be feeling a different person altogether - healthier, etc.

All rather disappointing really.

I felt better day 2 of my stop than I do now some 8 weeks later!

Any advice?

WHEN will it get easier - or are the feelings I have now nothing to do with withdrawal?

N

 

tea

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #107 on: May 20, 2019, 09:00:02 pm »
Ah well with no patch and no spray, today you are withdrawing from nicotine. But give it another 24 hours and with no spray like today you will be nicotine free and then it's all purely mind over matter. If you feel a bit shaky have some fruit juice or a cup of tea with sugar; it can bring your blood sugar back up. I think I put an article on here about cranberry juice being a recommended thing from scientific studies......never tried it myself.

However, once the nicotine is completely out of your system (unless you're coming down with something) you should be feeling better. If in doubt call the pharmacy.
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 

Not Another Puff

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #108 on: May 21, 2019, 09:03:57 am »
@bignige giving up smoking is a mixed bag of good and bad days. The brilliant thing is the number of good days increases and the number of bad days decrease over time.

Everyone is different, but I had a horrendous first 6 weeks and by 8 weeks felt a lot better.



35 years a smoker until Bastille Day 2018, now a smoker who is choosing not to smoke for the foreseeable future
 
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Skiddaw

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #109 on: May 21, 2019, 12:15:36 pm »
I think @Not Another Puff has hit the nail on the head dear @bignige . It's SO true- you can veer quite swiftly from feeling on top of the world to feeling pants. I can really identify with the 'nervy' thing because I was just the same. I hadn't expected it and it took a few months to pass but it DID pass and so will all the things you're experiencing at present.

The way to look at it perhaps is to remember how many years you subjected yourself to a constant dose of nicotine. It's no wonder that it takes a wee while for your body (and your mind) to properly re-boot.

There will come a time when you'll read back over your post and find it almost impossible to remember how you felt back then. And I bet, if you look at yourself in a mirror, you'll notice how much better your skin and hair look and how much brighter your eyes are. Not to mention how fabulous it is not to wheeze at night any longer and how much easier it is to run for the bus.... :hug: :hug: :hug:
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So many mountains, so little time...
 

bignige

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #110 on: May 21, 2019, 07:43:38 pm »
Thank you so much for all the support. Today has been a little easier then yesterday and of course as Skiddaw says it will take a while I expect getting over 40 years of smoking every single day.

I have not used the spray today again and no patch. Still chewing (literally, rather than "puffing") on the inhalator - it has got to go and I reckon the only way is to throw it in the bin - it just seems to make me feel sick TBH but I keep turning to it habitually.

I am booked in to smoking cessation clinic on Thursday - this will I suspect be my last attendance - I don't need any products and I hope I am OK now to keep "weathering the storm" without any patches etc.

N
 
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tea

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #111 on: May 21, 2019, 11:45:14 pm »
If you're chewing it can we swap it for a big piece of liquorice?
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 
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Skiddaw

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #112 on: May 22, 2019, 09:28:30 am »
...Or sugar-free gum? I became the world expert on sugar-free gum. I still occasionally find half-empty packs of it in coat pockets and the bottoms of bags.  :)

Well done @bignige ! You're doing SO well and should be SO proud of yourself. I think a wee Bank Holiday Weekend treat should be in the offing.  :foundbeer:
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 

bignige

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #113 on: May 22, 2019, 07:05:50 pm »
Thanks Tea and Skiddaw. Not keen on liquorice or gum!

I have cut down today using the inhalator and will speak with the chap at Smoking Cessation tomorrow and see what he suggests ref getting rid of the inhalator.

He prescribed me the spray - but not used that at all for a couple of days now.

Today was a "good" or rather "better" day then yesterday. Keeping busy definitely helps - spent 4 hours driving then home and took dog for a walk, cooked tea and hey ho - day almost gone!

Since I am no longer on the patches (although I stopped wearing them whilst asleep after "the dreams" (lol)) I have also noticed I am having trouble getting off to sleep at night - mind seems to become more active as soon as I hit the pillow - and I am waking up earlier and feeling restless.

Hopefully the above will also pass.

Weekend treat? Hoping to go fishing with my father-in-law for the first time in over 12 months.

Treat will be buying a new stove to make our cuppas on!!

That leads me to the topic of money - I haven't been keeping count but must saved more than £1000 over the past 8 weeks or so!

Finally, I hope to remember to ask the smoking cessation chap the exact date I first went to see him - as I will then know my "quit date" which was 2 days after I first attended Smoking Cessation.

N
 
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Skiddaw

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #114 on: May 23, 2019, 09:03:12 am »
Oooh that sounds SO positive @bignige !!  :foundbeer: :foundbeer: :foundbeer: I think you're over the hump now and that you may well find you start to naturally use the inhaler less and less without really noticing it. Your weekend fishing trip sounds lovely!  :)

Yes, deffo check your quit date. We have a Penthouse Arrival party to begin planning.  008
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 

Not Another Puff

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #115 on: May 23, 2019, 09:25:46 am »
@bignige irregular sleep patterns are a thing when giving up smoking I am afraid.

Physical exercise so you are tired can help a little bit. The added advantage of it is hard to crave a cigarette when you are blowing and sucking in trees during exercise.

Your quit sounds very positive, congratulations.
35 years a smoker until Bastille Day 2018, now a smoker who is choosing not to smoke for the foreseeable future
 

Nicky40

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #116 on: May 24, 2019, 09:43:21 am »
I read about insomnia when stopping smoking and apparently a smokers sleep patterns aren't normal, so when you stop smoking your body is just trying to become how it is supposed to be which causes some temporary side effects.  They will go (well my disturbed sleep hasn't but that is menopause related more than quitting) and things will improve, noticeably in my experience.

Well done on trying to stop the NRT but it doesn't really matter how long you use the help available, all better than smoking.  007
Smoked for most of my adult life (and a fair bit of my childhood!).  Managed a two year quit 2014-2016 but started again!  Quit again on 6th January 2018 and lasted 7 months!  Third quit lucky 21/11/2018!
 

Indigo Warrior

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #117 on: May 25, 2019, 05:05:42 pm »
@bignige, fab news that you are still being the nicotine warrior and fighting that beast. There will be days when you get to the end of the day and you may not have thought about it once but others where it seems to be almost constant. That is the nicotine gremlin trying to trick you.

I found frozen grapes were a good choice to suck or aniseed sweets but you will find something that works for you.

If you are continuing to feel tired etc, get the practice nurse/GP to double check that there isn't a health issue that is making this harder than it needs be e.g a viral/bacterial infection, low iron levels or thyriod problem.
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bignige

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #118 on: May 27, 2019, 04:00:51 pm »
Hi all.

Still going! Today is feeling like a couple of previous Sundays - hard work!! Feeling nervy and narky!! Must be the lack of activity on a Sunday - not doing much so not busy.

Yesterday was a walk in the park - so the comments about good and bad days definitely apply to my situation.

I "signed off" at Smoking Cessation last Thursday and won't be attending again. I have the guy's phone number if needed.

I have an unopened pack of 7mg patches if I get really desperate.

The more I think about things - I am actually now "cold turkey" - and have been since I stopped using patches - which I assume explains why I am struggling. In terms of not having any nicotine entering my body it is in fact fairly early days?????

Hope that makes sense?

The Smoking Cessation chap also told me that my quit date was Saturday 23 March.

N
 

Skiddaw

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Re: New stopper
« Reply #119 on: May 27, 2019, 04:18:08 pm »
That's fantastic @bignige - over 2 months in!!  :foundbeer: :foundbeer: :foundbeer:

And yes, as you say, you're now flying without the aid of a safety net so your body is adapting to being nicotine-free. It may be sticky today but tomorrow will probably be like yesterday- a walk in the park. What you'll find is that the 'walk in the park' days start to outnumber the sticky days as the weeks pass and it really will become easier and easier. My experience was that non-routine times (holidays, events such as weddings, etc) tended to be harder than routine days especially during the first six months. It's all a part of the pathways in your brain re-routing but you'll come through it in the end I promise.

Congratulations on signing off at the Smoking Cessation clinic too! You should be SO proud of what you have achieved.  ;D 007
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...