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Author Topic: The health project  (Read 1470 times)

Burners

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The health project
« on: April 20, 2018, 11:00:57 pm »
So I got myself viral meningitis this year and it's taking FOREVER to get better.
I quit drinking awhile so I could get better, and realised I was skirting around what I really need to get rid of.

Day 2. Still craving SO BAD. Is it a bad idea to try this while ill?

I just want to funnel everything into getting well this net few months!

O! Hi everybody! Look forward to getting to know you all.

Burners - been chain-smoking rollups for 17 years. Yikes.
Non-smoking life commenced: 19th April 2018.
Smoking history: 17 years' chainsmoking - 10 v quiet day, 20 typical, 40 easy on a boozy night - and there were many, many boozy nights. Weapon of choice: roll ups.
Quit weapon of choice: cold turkey, hot baths, this forum!
 

tea

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Re: The health project
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2018, 11:07:10 pm »
You poor thing! But I have to say I quit while I was ill and it worked wonders for me with the tonsillitis; by the time I was better at least a week had gone. Then I got some lozenges for just in case I got tempted. I do hope you feel better soon though.
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 

Sally

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Re: The health project
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2018, 11:13:30 pm »
Welcome to Just Quit Burners.

I don't think it's a bad idea to quit when you're ill, hopefully quitting will help you get better quicker.  Are you using any NRT?

Well done for getting through Day One.
Quit date - 1st October 2014, Quit method - lozenges

 
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Burners

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Re: The health project
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2018, 11:34:01 pm »
I'm not, just cold turkey and copious amounts of clove oil so far!
Is that madness?
Non-smoking life commenced: 19th April 2018.
Smoking history: 17 years' chainsmoking - 10 v quiet day, 20 typical, 40 easy on a boozy night - and there were many, many boozy nights. Weapon of choice: roll ups.
Quit weapon of choice: cold turkey, hot baths, this forum!
 

tea

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Re: The health project
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2018, 06:14:15 am »
Not at all.
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 

Sally

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Re: The health project
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2018, 07:00:58 am »
Not madness, I admire anybody who quits cold turkey.  I used lozenges and then had to quit them!
Quit date - 1st October 2014, Quit method - lozenges

 

Burners

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Re: The health project
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2018, 09:05:18 am »
Can any people ore advanced advise me on some approx milestone dates?

I've read that AA has things like 30 days, 90 days.... are there any 'aim for this' dates you'd recommend?
Non-smoking life commenced: 19th April 2018.
Smoking history: 17 years' chainsmoking - 10 v quiet day, 20 typical, 40 easy on a boozy night - and there were many, many boozy nights. Weapon of choice: roll ups.
Quit weapon of choice: cold turkey, hot baths, this forum!
 

Sally

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Re: The health project
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2018, 09:24:04 am »
When I first quit just making it through an hour was an achievement! 

I think the ‘rooms’ here are good milestone markers, plus 100 days, that often seems to be a real turning point for some.
Quit date - 1st October 2014, Quit method - lozenges

 
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LAST CHANCE SALOON

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Re: The health project
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2018, 09:58:04 am »
Your quite right @Sally ,that 100 days was so big for many of us, it meant we had got over the craves, finished with NRT if using any or changed to a bit of vaping,didn't think about smoking all day and started to look at how healthy we were getting and over the moon that my leg worked again, how much more money we had, and how fast the months were going by now we were not counting every hour.:)
Quit 16th November 2017.
Last smoke 21st November 2017.
Trigger word...LEG.
 
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Skiddaw

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Re: The health project
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2018, 10:28:13 am »
Welcome to the forum from me too @Burners  :)

I'm another who quit when ill (though only a respiratory infection rather than viral meningitis you poor person  :hug: :hug: :hug:). I was a roll-up smoker too (and had smoked for 32 years) so believe me, it can be done (I promise). I think you're incredibly courageous to go cold turkey- I know I couldn't have got through those first few weeks without patches and lozenges- but it sounds to me like you have the determination to make it to what our @Max414 calls the sunlit uplands that lie just a wee way ahead of you.

We'll do all we can to assist you on your journey. It probably feels as if every hour is an endurance test right now, but just you wait- you'll be counting in weeks, months and eventually years before you know it. There is life after quitting honestly.  008 008 008
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 
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Burners

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Re: The health project
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2018, 03:58:19 pm »
Ahh thanks all, this is really useful!

I'm eager to hear some stories of life improving after... as opposed to just the white-knuckling through! So very glad to have found this place!  007

Currently just taking the rampantly strong desire to smoke as a serious sign that I absolutely should not be smoking.
Non-smoking life commenced: 19th April 2018.
Smoking history: 17 years' chainsmoking - 10 v quiet day, 20 typical, 40 easy on a boozy night - and there were many, many boozy nights. Weapon of choice: roll ups.
Quit weapon of choice: cold turkey, hot baths, this forum!
 
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aneggisanegg

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Re: The health project
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2018, 12:50:35 am »
Can any people ore advanced advise me on some approx milestone dates?

I've read that AA has things like 30 days, 90 days.... are there any 'aim for this' dates you'd recommend?

From my own experience I would say steer away from aiming for dates.  Successfully quitting smoking is not about ticking days off a calendar, it is about reaching a state of mind where you are at peace and happy with your smoke free life.  That means accepting smoking for what it really is - the legal face of drug addiction.  Smoking is just a means of delivering nicotine - you can replace it with NRT or e-cigs but ultimately this is just delaying the day when you say goodbye to nicotine.  Once you've put nicotine in your past you'll come to realise that your great 'friend' is really not a friend at all - it appears to help in every situation but in reality the only help it gives is to relieve the problem it created in the first place - it relieves the withdrawal it created.  Some friend!  You can battle with this for months and months or it can come very quickly, but once you really get it, a smoke free life is so much easier and happier than you could begin to imagine.

I beat this demon over five years ago - do I miss it? - not a bit, I can't even begin to understand why I was under it's spell for so long. Such is the madness of addiction.
 

Nicky40

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Re: The health project
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2018, 08:25:44 am »
Hi @Burners and welcome to the (best) quit smoking forum  :) :)  I was a smoker for a little under 30 years in total, first cigarettes, then roll ups and I'm still a fairly new quitter, on 15 weeks now.

I wasn't ill when I quit but I did always find that although I would still smoke through illness, I didn't really enjoy the cigarettes much so maybe it is a good time to stop.  I do hope you are feeling a little better now a few days later.  007
Smoked for most of my adult life (and a fair bit of my childhood!).  Managed a two year quit 2014-2016 but started again!  Quit again on 6th January 2018 and lasted 7 months!  Back on the wagon again now...........