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Author Topic: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking  (Read 1219 times)

Thanos Apos

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The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« on: February 23, 2017, 03:48:49 pm »
Hi, everybody!   :)

I’m Thanos Apos, and I would like to inform you about my new book concerning smoking.

I will be happy to answer to all your questions and feedback.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2017, 07:38:23 pm by KitKat »
Do you want to quit smoking? Download now my new free ebook
 

KitKat

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2017, 07:53:05 pm »
Ok people, please note that Thanos's book has not been approved by the  Admin of this forum, but if it serves to help people quit smoking, then that cannot be a bad thing.


KK ;)



Manners maketh man, not the way he spells it
 

Max414

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2017, 08:48:31 pm »
Have the admin of this forum,looked at this book,in order to assess it?It might be good,for all we know.
Cos it would be helpful  :D
30 years of rollups,20 a day

9.53 pm Dec 28th 2012 >>>>>>>........last cancer stick..

With help from Champix and the late Mr Allen Carr,
The Nicdemon met his Waterloo at Xmas 2012 :-)
 

tea

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2017, 09:39:00 pm »
Ok, well I was a guinea pig....I read the free download which is not the full book. I did like the bits with Mr Suspicious and the analysis of why certain tactics don't guarantee a quit (such as switching to light cigarettes, cutting down, 'occasional' smoking, etc).  However, I found  the analysis of narcotics to be overly simplistic and the free download does not offer 'the easy way' solution itself so I cannot critique that. I was surprised not to see any grounding in psychological theories of addiction and recovery.

I'm a theorist, so this doesn't meet the style that I personally look for in a book; that's not to say that it won't be to other people's tastes. It is a free download so it does give you the opportunity to try before you buy.
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 
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Max414

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2017, 10:37:02 am »
Nice one Tea.  ;D
There is a wider debate to be had about what makes a good quitting book,how to access the ones that people agree do work,etc.Even we here,could probably write a book between us, and see it released to a wider market. A Chapter each,as it were  :hug:

So important is it,to stop poisoning ourselves this way,that I reckon each and every book that purports to assist the quit deserves a look. The well known @Easy way to stop smoking' by Allen Carr helped me a lot,but I know a lot of people read that and found themselves unmoved.There is so much psychology involved in a successful quit.
30 years of rollups,20 a day

9.53 pm Dec 28th 2012 >>>>>>>........last cancer stick..

With help from Champix and the late Mr Allen Carr,
The Nicdemon met his Waterloo at Xmas 2012 :-)
 

Thanos Apos

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2017, 04:00:41 pm »
Great comments, thank you all..

tea,
Thank you for reading the ebook! I have many things to tell you, but I will keep it short.
Scientific approaches (biological or psychological) often fail to give any help to the addicted persons, for many reasons. On the other hand, Allen Carr, an accountant, wrote a very good book without using any scientific research at all. Strange? I quote something about another serious addiction for which many scientific studies made, with no use for the addicted gamblers:
Quote
The absence of a chemical substance in gambling led the
science of psychiatry to the pathetic feat of acknowledging
gambling as an addiction as recently as 2013!
“In the 80s, the American Psychiatric Association
(APA) officially classified pathological gambling as an
impulse-control disorder—a fuzzy label for a group of
somewhat related illnesses that, at the time, included
kleptomania, pyromania, and trichotillomania (hairpulling).”
(source: Scientific American Magazine)

A problem I had during writing the book, was to keep a balance (even more for the free version), to be brief and not tiring for the reader, and at the same time convincing for the "advanced" reader who seeks details and a more scientific approach. The chapter "General Theory of Addiction" you mention, is more theoretical, and I admit it, it provides no proofs, although real life seems to confirm it in my opinion. The approach in this chapter is somewhat philosophical.

But the most important thing in your review is your impression about the book, which is very useful for me. If I receive many reviews like this, I will make edits and additions to the next edition of the book.

I can tell you for now, something about the biology of smoking. It might interests you.
Quote
Nicotine mimics our transmitter, acetylcholine.
Nicotine mimics it, and binds in its receptors in the
brain. We could say that nicotine “takes over the work of
acetylcholine.” However, nicotine is not broken down by
acetylcholinesterase (unlike acetylcholine), so it transmits to
the neurons many more signals, in relation to acetylcholine.
This, through various mechanisms, leads to the excessive
increase in acetylcholine receptors in the brain. This is the
most important biological effect of nicotine.

And the problem is that acetylcholine disregulation hit us in our weak spot...
Quote
When you quit smoking, for a few days, the acetylcholine
receptors in the brain are deregulated. This is the delayed
irritation. Some mental functions related to acetylcholine
are obstructed. Among them are the ones concerning…determination!

No matter how firm the decision you have taken, it becomes
less firm, not because you have “lost it,” but because your
brain chemistry does not allow certain aspects of determination
to properly manifest themselves. These components
of determination that are obstructed are excitement (enthusiasm)
and clarity of thinking.

Tea, thank you again for reading the book and your review!

Thank you admins for allowing me to present my work here. As long as this thread is alive, I will try to give help and answers. You can ask me ANYTHING you want about, not only the book, but quitting smoking in general. My English is not very good. I understand almost everything I read, but I have problems in producing English text.. so it takes me much time to write something and express my thoughts. But I 'll try when I find free time.

Have a nice weekend  :)
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tea

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2017, 05:30:20 pm »
Ah well, for me I prefer Prochaska and Declimente's 'Changing for Good' which is grounded in psychological theory of addiction and shows that in order to break a cycle of addiction you do need to create the 'cognitive dissonance': the part that says 'whoa there, the cons do outweigh the pros'. You also then need the motivation to move into the action to change the behaviour and maintain the change. I think that the part I would then interject into this from my own personal and professional experience is the motivation of adding in cognitive behavioural conditioning by rewarding yourself with treats for stopping the bad behaviour; so that when you have £7 instead of spending it on a packet of cigarettes you spend it on something positive for you instead, or in the time that you would have spent 5 minutes smoking you do @Max414's quitters' quiz and maybe you come 1st or 2nd and feel good for having had a 'productive' distraction. Our brains quickly do reprogramme from 'I need to suck on a burning stick of dead leaves' to 'I have a few minutes to do the quiz and I can buy myself flowers on the way home from work'. It's these rewards that make maintaining the behaviour change easier and more sustainable in the long term.

But like you say, it's not rocket science and it is transferrable to all addictions or behaviours that people want to change. Also, you do have to be in the right frame of mind in terms of the 'cognitive dissonance' to take you out of the denial that you like the behaviour you're trying to change: you have to be at a point in your life where you know that the cons outweigh the positives.

So if I ever ask a quitter after 3 weeks, "how much have you saved and how are you going to treat yourself' I'm reminding them that the money and the choice of reward is a positive thing to support their new behaviour. I can't make anyone's quit 'effortless', but I can make it more pleasant by making some of it fun, sociable and less about 'giving up'. 

This is why I also very strongly believe that the support of others who are going through or have been through that change is beneficial.  I don't usually flick my hair, peer over my glasses and say "listen carefully, here comes the science", but  all of the NRT adverts will say "willpower is required" and the reason is that the cognitive brain reprogramming part has to come from a change of behaviour and that change is all in your thinking which determines your action.

12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 

Thanos Apos

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2017, 03:34:39 pm »
Hi all, a very shinny day here in Greece.
Cognitive therapy is indeed the only way to cure the mind of a smoker. Tea, I have not read the book you mention. It must be interesting. I note it for a future reading.

If we think quitting smoking as a goal, like a diet, or an exercise program, or study for exams there is a problem: For every goal like the above, a failure can act as a motive for a bigger effort and better results. For example, let's say my goal is to train 4 times a week and avoid sugar. I start very determined, but the 3rd week, I have some visitors, I go to a party... So I train only 1 time and I eat 4 ice-creams... If I am determined and have a clear vision of my goal, this 3rd week can act as a motive. The 4th week I can make a new start and continue more dynamically than before.

Unlike other goals, quitting smoking (and drugs generally) does not allow the slightest slip. Only one cigarrete after 3 weeks, or 3 months, although it tastes awful, it is a guaranty that we will be smokers again. The next day, there is no way to be more determined and strong... The next days we become smokers again, and usually for a long time.

This strange thing happens because smoking is not a "bad habit", and quitting smoking cannot be a "goal" like others. It is a trap for humans. Stopping it can be easy, and also can be a nightmare or even something impossible.

I avoid "money motivation", for example, I never say to myself: "congratulations! you can have extra vacations with the money saved from smoking". The reason is that every smoker who "respects himself" (it's a Greek phrase I don't know how it sounds in English), would rather prefer have a life without suffering and deprivation, than having extra holidays, a new car/apartment. Even the ultimate positive motivation (saving you own life), in many cases, seems it is not working. Why?

The reason is that every motivation like these, in many smokers strengthens the no 1 enemy of quitting smoking. The enemy that will make you smoke till you die from it. The enemy that makes quitting smoking harder than quitting heroin in some cases.

The idea (with deep roots to our unconscious), that by quitting smoking you made a sacrifice.

The variations of this idea are many. But you can describe any variation, with only one word: Lie.

The lie is the enemy. So if quitting smoking really needs effort, I spend it all, for clearing the lie. I don't spend any effort to "forget it" or to change behavior patterns, or to "be strong" or to have any assistance from family and friends etc.

All my effort is to understand, not what smoking steals from our life, like money, health BUT,

what smoking offers, which is... nothing.

This last phrase is a SCANDAL for every smoker in the world, as he or she has clearly seen, that at least a few of his cigarettes have offered him some real pleasure.

Note: Tea, the small disagreement I expressed above, about "positive motivation" you mention, does not mean at all that I say "I am right and you are wrong". Obviously, you have found ways that this idea is working and brings results through your personal interaction and other ways. It depends on how you use it. There are many ways one can approach the solution. I just gave a personal view of what works for me.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2017, 03:39:17 pm by Thanos Apos »
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Lostie

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2017, 04:01:08 pm »


I avoid "money motivation", for example, I never say to myself: "congratulations! you can have extra vacations with the money saved from smoking". The reason is that every smoker who "respects himself" (it's a Greek phrase I don't know how it sounds in English), would rather prefer have a life without suffering and deprivation, than having extra holidays, a new car/apartment. Even the ultimate positive motivation (saving you own life), in many cases, seems it is not working. Why?



I firmly believe that you should reward yourself with money saved. Quitting smoking does give you extra money and it can so easily just go into 'every day living' expenses. I was always poor when I smoked, now I don't smoke, I have money that would have gone up in smoke. I started rewarding myself with a bunch of flowers from the supermarket. As the money built up I could buy larger items eg a fridge.  I did quit because of health reasons, not for financial reasons, but the money grows when you don't spend it on cigs.
 

Kat73

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2017, 06:23:26 pm »
at least a few of his cigarettes have offered him some real pleasure.

I'm afraid I have to take issue with that particular sentence, to my mind we have all justified smoking by saying that we enjoy it but the cold, hard truth of it is that we smoke because of the sense of satisfaction it provides when the craving caused by our addiction is satisfied and that is a very different thing.  What does everyone else think?
Smoker for 20+ years with a 3 year quit in the middle
Used Champix 16/01/13 to 12/02/13
Last cigarette 8pm 28/01/13
 

Max414

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2017, 08:53:56 pm »
I like reading Thanos' musings .I like the notion of stripping away the 'what does a cig offer you?-nothing' but I think still that alone,that is not enough to make the quitting process strong enough to work. I agree with Tea that rewarding yourself for stopping is a very effective countermeasure against the lure of starting again.
Like many people here,I loved smoking,I can see myself right now,stood by the back door puffing away feeling the 'hit' and feeling a kind of peace. I could easily have not quit,,and still be smoking.What was it that enabled me to quit when I did? It's a miracle even now,that I succeeded  8)  :hug: The difference is that I have broken the addiction,there is no physical or psychological desire to smoke any longer-and that is what keeps you bound in chains,the addiction.truly the ciggie gives pleasure only because it satisfies the craving caused by the one you had before.A Circle of death from which is it hard to escape.
30 years of rollups,20 a day

9.53 pm Dec 28th 2012 >>>>>>>........last cancer stick..

With help from Champix and the late Mr Allen Carr,
The Nicdemon met his Waterloo at Xmas 2012 :-)
 

Skiddaw

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2017, 10:27:53 am »
For me, until I was really, truly ready to quit, all the words in the world would have made no difference. I knew fundamentally that smoking was A Bad Thing and was doing nothing for me but it didn't really mean anything if that makes sense. Like @Max414 , I don't know exactly what it was that flipped in my brain when I did manage to quit, only that I really, really wanted to quit (whereas my heart had never been in it on previous attempts). What cause that I don't know- a combination of factors probably- but I know it felt different right from the start and despite the difficult times I knew deep down that I would never smoke again.

Therefore, I think books such as @Thanos Apos 's book (and Alan Carr, and the rest) are a useful resource, but only when you've already started the journey mentally.
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 
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Thanos Apos

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Re: The Effortless Way to Stop Smoking
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2017, 01:08:02 pm »
Skiddaw, I agree with you. When you will not feel this deep feeling, this deep kind of decision, then you will probably relapse... But this feeling is not a guarantee of success. I felt it many times in the past, and.. I relapsed. But yes, this "final" attempt has to have this deep certainty that you have already succeed.

I want to clarify something I wrote previously. I avoid the "money motivation" for the first days of stopping smoking, and especially the days before the quit day (preparation) for the reasons I mentioned. But I admit it, it is a great thing to use, after some time. Whenever you think of smoking to substitute the temptations (lies) with what you have earned from quitting it.

I am open to any question about smoking, although all of you have knowledge. As Max414 said, almost every member of a forum like this, could write a small book about quitting smoking.
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