Kick the habit with fun, free, friendly support to be a new smoke free you xx

Author Topic: 15 Hours and counting  (Read 1888 times)

Nigalius

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 51
  • Thanked: 38 times
15 Hours and counting
« on: January 11, 2017, 10:34:16 am »
Ah well, its now over 15 hours since a smoke and for a 40 roll ups a day person I am quite pleased. I dont feel any different yet but have read that certain things have started leaving my body. I am determined to go at least a day which will be 19.00 today. Then, if I do want to have a smoke of a maximum 2 a day I can do that in the knowledge that I can stop for 24 hours from 40 a day so 1 smoke every 12 hours should be a breeze. I know that would not be a reccomended method but I seriously think I could cope with that. At the moment it is not easy but I am defo going to do 24 hours and see what I am like.
I know a lot of things, I just cant remember them.
 

Lostie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2499
  • Thanked: 1532 times
  • Reformed Smoker
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2017, 10:50:51 am »
I just replied on your other thread ;D

I forgot to say I do agree with you keeping your cigs if that's what you want to do. I did, but never touched them!!!!  They were my security blanket.

You are doing really well, but I'm sorry if you think you can have a cigarette every 12 hours I'm pretty sure you will find out it doesn't work that way.  You will have wasted your first day and just keep repeating it trying to get rid of all those toxins out of your body. Please think very hard before you light up again.
 

Titch

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1376
  • Thanked: 799 times
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2017, 11:04:40 am »
Its the addiction to nicotine that is tricking you into thinking one smoke every 12 hours will be OK.  I used to be just like that.  Id say to myself hey one every now and then has to be better than 20 a day.  But believe me it isnt.  That one every 12 hours will turn into one every 6 hours then 1 hour and then before you know it you are back to square one.

Make a conscious effort to say you will not smoke for 24 hours.  At the end of the 24 hours you will be so pleased with yourself and then why not try and extend that by another hour and then another and another.   

Just one hour at a time is all it takes to plant the basis of a forever quit.
After far too many years I stubbed out my final cigarette on February 6 2011 at 10 pm and havent looked back since.
 
The following users thanked this post: Lostie, Glasgowgal

Skiddaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6092
  • Thanked: 2502 times
  • Quit bagger
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2017, 11:04:47 am »
Welcome to the forum from me @Nigalius  ;D

You're doing incredibly well. I was a roll-up smoker too and I was probably getting through at least 20-30 per day so definitely in the same league. There's only one trick to this quitting lark and that's to keep going. If you can do that I promise you'll come out the other side of all the difficult and nasty stuff and you'll feel like a million dollars.

If it is any help, I tried the 'cutting down' thing many times (not smoking during the day, rationing myself to 3 roll ups, etc) but it never worked. Inevitably, it just crept up again and I was soon back to where I had started.

Hold on in there @Nigalius and we shall all be cheering for you  :hug: :hug: :foundbeer: :foundbeer:
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 
The following users thanked this post: Lostie

Skiddaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6092
  • Thanked: 2502 times
  • Quit bagger
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2017, 11:17:22 am »
....by the way, having read your other post now, I'll be 53 this year and I smoked from my mid/late teens until I was 49 so again we're not so very different.

Have you considered vaping, or using nicotine replacement therapy? I used a mixture of patches and lozenges for the first couple of months and it really did get me over the hump. That way, you can continue to recieve a nicotine hit when you need it without sacrificing your quit.  :)
Finally saw sense on 8/12/13

So many mountains, so little time...
 

tea

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6836
  • Thanked: 2973 times
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2017, 11:28:44 am »
Well I would like to say well done for coming so far this far. Take it hour by hour before you commit to day by day. If you can do 24 hours maybe you could try for 48 and the nicotine would be leaving your system. I can understand how it is difficult from 40 a day for 50 years to nothing straight away. I think @Max414 was a roll up because I remember him saying how he used to make them matchstick thin and cut down before committing to the big quit. Everyone is different in how they quit and every quit tests people's limits.
12.9.2014  (I forget sometimes)
 
The following users thanked this post: Lostie

TG

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3543
  • Thanked: 2434 times
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2017, 03:17:31 pm »
Firstly,  welcome @Nigalius and congratulations on your quit so far. 

As others have said if you have gone 24 hrs without a cigarette why have the odd one or two?  If you want to be free don't have any.  We say this because all you will be doing is keeping the addition alive and making it worst for yourself.
I copied this post from whyquit.com It is blunt and to the point on cutting down. I hope it makes you reconsider what you are thinking.

Stay with us bubby and use us for support.  The grass is definitely greener on the other side.

Quitting by Gradual Withdrawal

Quitting by the gradual withdrawal method.  I discuss this method quite extensively in my seminars.  I always tell how if there is anyone attending who knows a smoker who they really despise they should actively encourage them to follow the gradual withdrawal "cut down" approach.  They should call them up every day and tell them to just get rid of one cigarette.  Meaning, if they usually smoke 40 a day, just smoke 39 on the first day of the attempt to quit.  The next day they should be encouraged to smoke only 38 then 37 the next day and so on.  Then the seminar participant should call these people every day to congratulate them and encourage them to continue.  I must reemphasize, this should only be done to a smoker you really despise.

You see, most smokers will agree to this approach.  It sounds so easy to just smoke one less each day.  Thirty-nine cigarettes to a two pack a day smoker seems like nothing.  The trick is to convince the person that you are only trying to help them.  For the first week or two the one downside is you have to pretend to like the person and you have to talk to them every day.  They won't whine too bad either.  When they are down to 30 from 40, they may start to complain a little.  You really won't be having fun yet.  When the payoff comes is about three weeks into the scam.  Now you've got them to less than half their normal amount.  They are in moderate withdrawal all the time.

A month into the approach you've got them into pretty major withdrawal.  But be persistent.  Call them and tell them how great they are doing and how proud you are of them.  When they are in their 35th to 39th day, you have pulled off a major coup.  This poor person is in peak withdrawal, suffering miserably and having absolutely nothing to show for it.  They are no closer to ending withdrawal than the day you started the process.  They are in chronic withdrawal, not treating him or herself to one or two a day, but actually depriving him or herself of 35 to 40 per day.

If you want to go in for the kill, when you have them down to zero, tell them don't worry if things get tough, just take a puff every once in a while.  If you can get them to fall for this, taking one puff every third day, they will remain in withdrawal forever.  Did I mention you really should despise this person to do this to them?  It is probably the cruelest practical joke that you could ever pull on anyone.  You will undercut their chance to quit, make them suffer immeasurably and likely they will at some point throw in the towel, return to smoking, have such fear of quitting because of what they went through cutting down, that they will continue to smoke until it kills them.  Like I said, you better really despise this person.

Hopefully there is no one you despise that much to do this to them.  I hope nobody despises themselves enough to do this to themselves.  Quitting cold turkey may be hard but quitting by this withdrawal technique is virtually impossible.  If you have a choice between hard and impossible, go for hard.  You will have something to show at the end of a hard process, but nothing but misery at the end of an impossible approach.  Quit cold and in 72 hours it eases up.  Cut down and it will basically get progressively worse for weeks, months, or years if you let it.

I should mention, this is not a new technique.  It has been around for decades.  Talk to every long-term ex-smoker you know.  Try to find one person who successfully used the cut down approach, gradually reducing to eventual zero over weeks or months.  You will be hard pressed to find even one person who fits this bill.  One other perspective that should help you see the flaw in the approach.  Look at people here who had once quit for months or years and then relapsed.  One day, after such a long time period, they take a drag and are smoking again.  If one puff can do this after years or decades, guess what it will do after days or hours of being smoke free.  It puts the smoker back to square one. All that any ex-smoker has to do to avoid relapse or chronic withdrawal is to - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!


Joel
Quit Date: 04-04-2014

You don’t need cigarettes to be complete. All the happiness, comfort and peace you seek, is already inside you.
 

1Bluetree

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: 15 Hours and counting
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2017, 03:45:57 pm »
I know your going thru it mentally! Been here!
Keep being positive!  :foundbeer: